viernes, 24 de noviembre de 2017

Parkinson's Disease - Nov 23, 2017 Edition

 
 November 23, 2017 
 Parkinson's Disease 
 The latest Parkinson's disease news from News Medical 
 Parkinson's disease will soon become looming pandemic, research revealsParkinson's disease will soon become looming pandemic, research reveals
 
New research shows that the number of people with Parkinson's disease will soon grow to pandemic proportions. In a commentary appearing today in the journal JAMA Neurology, University of Rochester Medical Center neurologist Ray Dorsey, M.D. and Bastiaan Bloem, M.D., Ph.D., with Radboud University Medical Center in the Netherlands, argue that the medical community must be mobilized to respond to this impending public health threat.
 
 
 Study points at lysosomal storage disorder genes as potential key contributors to Parkinson'sStudy points at lysosomal storage disorder genes as potential key contributors to Parkinson's
 
An international study has shed new light on the genetic factors associated with Parkinson's disease, pointing at a group of lysosomal storage disorder genes as potential major contributors to the onset and progression of this common neurodegenerative disorder. The study appears in the journal Brain.
 
   New study shows how SNO reaction may contribute to Parkinson's diseaseNew study shows how SNO reaction may contribute to Parkinson's disease
 
A new study from The Scripps Research Institute is the first to show precisely how a process in nerve cells called the S-nitrosylation (SNO) reaction- which can be caused by aging, pesticides and pollution- may contribute to Parkinson's disease.
 
 Scientists develop novel mouse model to capture pathology of sporadic ALS and FTD
 
Scientists develop novel mouse model to capture pathology of sporadic ALS and FTDNeurodegenerative diseases are incurable and debilitating conditions that result in progressive degeneration and death of nerve cells, which leads to problems with movement or mental functioning. Examples include Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD).
 
 
 Nanowires could be potential drug delivery tools for neurodegenerative diseases
 
Nanowires could be potential drug delivery tools for neurodegenerative diseasesMillions of Americans suffer from neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Researchers have identified promising new treatments, such as cerebrolysin, but current clinical approaches are ineffective because critical concentrations of the drug dissipate within the body before reaching the blood-brain barrier and central nervous system.
 

Prostate Cancer - Nov 23, 2017 Edition

 
 November 23, 2017 
 Prostate Cancer 
 The latest prostate cancer news from News Medical 
 Common genetic fusion event could help identify patients with low-risk prostate cancerCommon genetic fusion event could help identify patients with low-risk prostate cancer
 
Establishing the way in which a genetic alteration called a TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion forms in a prostate cancer, rather than the presence of the gene fusion itself, could help identify patients with prostate cancer with a low risk of spreading, which might determine the best course of treatment for the patient.
 
 
 Small protein modification can trigger invasive properties of prostate cancer cells, research findsSmall protein modification can trigger invasive properties of prostate cancer cells, research finds
 
A small protein modification can trigger the aggressive migratory and invasive properties of prostate cancer cells, according to new research published on the cover of Oncotarget. The findings give greater insight into how cancers can move from one location in the body to another, and could help develop more effective therapies in the future.
 
   Anti-parasite drug acts like tailored medicine against colon, prostate cancerAnti-parasite drug acts like tailored medicine against colon, prostate cancer
 
Medicine against parasites like Tapeworms and Giardia, contains a substance that kills Prostate- and colon cancer.
 
   Use of Prostate Health Index cuts down need for uncomfortable biopsiesUse of Prostate Health Index cuts down need for uncomfortable biopsies
 
The Prostate Health Index is a cost-effective tool used by urologists to detect prostate cancer. It reduces the risk of over diagnosis, and cuts down on the need to send men for unnecessary and often uncomfortable biopsies.
 
 UVA researchers developing new tool to help cancer patients make complex care decisions
 
UVA researchers developing new tool to help cancer patients make complex care decisionsResearchers at the University of Virginia Cancer Center are developing a tool to help patients with prostate cancer better understand the potential risks and rewards of their treatment options. And that tool could ultimately benefit not just those patients but a broad spectrum of patients making complex care decisions based on their tumor's genomic information.
 
 
 Novel AR glasses help doctors to locate lymph nodes during surgery
 
Novel AR glasses help doctors to locate lymph nodes during surgeryMalignant tumors often form metastases that spread to other parts of the body via the lymphatic system. High surgical skills are required to identify the precise location of the affected lymph nodes, enabling them to be completely removed.
 

Gastroenterology‎ - Nov 22, 2017 Edition

 
 November 22, 2017 
 Gastroenterology‎ 
 The latest gastroenterology‎ news from News Medical 
 Inflammatory bowel disease patients over the age of 60 often receive older drugsInflammatory bowel disease patients over the age of 60 often receive older drugs
 
Inflammatory bowel disease is common amongst older people and there are big differences in the choice of treatment for different age groups. Patients over the age of 60 often receive cortisone drugs instead of more modern medicines that target the immune system.
 
 
 UA researchers receive grant to study effects of simulated space radiation on gastrointestinal tractUA researchers receive grant to study effects of simulated space radiation on gastrointestinal tract
 
The Center for Applied NanoBioscience and Medicine is doing its part to protect the health of astronauts on long-duration missions, including NASA's Journey to Mars.
 
   New health analysis in India finds increase in non-communicable diseasesNew health analysis in India finds increase in non-communicable diseases
 
A new state-by-state health analysis in India finds that over two decades heart- and lung-related conditions, as well as other non-communicable diseases (NCDs), have surpassed infectious diseases, such as diarrhea and tuberculosis, as the nation's leading killers.
 
   Penn researchers single out bacterial enzyme behind gut microbiome imbalance linked to Crohn’s diseasePenn researchers single out bacterial enzyme behind gut microbiome imbalance linked to Crohn’s disease
 
Penn Medicine researchers have singled out a bacterial enzyme behind an imbalance in the gut microbiome linked to Crohn's disease.
 
   Researcher awarded $1.5 million to study role of tumor necrosis factor in IBDResearcher awarded $1.5 million to study role of tumor necrosis factor in IBD
 
D. Brent Polk, MD, AGAF, an investigator at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, has been awarded $1.5 million by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the NIH for the study of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and its role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).
 
 PPI use not linked to increased risk of developing dementia
 
PPI use not linked to increased risk of developing dementiaProton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines commonly prescribed to treat acid-related digestive problems, including gastroesophageal reflux disease (or GERD).
 
 
 Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) Pathophysiology
 
Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) PathophysiologySmall intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a pathological overgrowth of gut bacteria upwards or rather in a retrograde fashion, into the upper gastrointestinal tract. This has many consequences, which reflect upon both intestinal and extraintestinal homeostasis.
 
 
 Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) Signs and Symptoms
 
Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) Signs and SymptomsSmall intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition in which there are an excessive number of bacteria in the small intestine. It is important as the cause of much gastrointestinal symptomatology, albeit non-specific, as well as systemic features, such as nutritional deficiencies, osteoporosis and significant asthenia. Diarrhea and malabsorption are frequently at the root of these complaints.
 
 
 Surgery for Piles
 
Surgery for PilesAlso referred to as hemorrhoids, piles are swollen veins inside the anal canal (internal hemorrhoids) or around the anus (external hemorrhoids). When anal or rectal tissue that has become swollen gets damaged, bleeding and pain may result.
 
 
 Risk Factors for Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth
 
Risk Factors for Small Intestinal Bacterial OvergrowthSmall intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a medical condition in which bacteria in the gut overgrow. This normally does not occur under good health conditions.
 
 
 Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) Treatment
 
Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) TreatmentSmall intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition in which gut bacteria grow up into the proximal small intestine. It can cause many nonspecific, but distressing conditions, and may lead to malnutrition as well as mucosal inflammation and increased mucosal permeability, both of which exacerbate malabsorption and may cause systemic or local hypersensitivity reactions to various foods.
 
 
 Researchers reduce over-prescription of antibiotics by using computer alerts to inform doctors
 
Researchers reduce over-prescription of antibiotics by using computer alerts to inform doctorsPhysicians at Kaiser Permanente in Southern California reduced the odds of prescribing an antibiotic for sinusitis by 22 percent using computer alerts to inform doctors when antibiotics may not be the best course of treatment. The research was published today in the American Journal of Managed Care.
 
 
 Liver disease in children with Alagille Syndrome caused by malformations of bile ducts
 
Liver disease in children with Alagille Syndrome caused by malformations of bile ductsSerious liver and heart problems can affect children with Alagille Syndrome early in life. While there is as yet no cure, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered that the liver disease part of the syndrome is caused by specific malformations of the bile ducts.
 
 
 FDA approves first adjuvant treatment to reduce risk of kidney cancer recurrence
 
FDA approves first adjuvant treatment to reduce risk of kidney cancer recurrenceThe U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Sutent (sunitinib malate) for the adjuvant treatment of adult patients who are at a high risk of kidney cancer (renal cell carcinoma) returning after a kidney has been removed (nephrectomy).
 
 
 Women have lower tolerance to alcohol following gastric sleeve surgery, study finds
 
Women have lower tolerance to alcohol following gastric sleeve surgery, study findsWomen who have had gastric sleeve surgery to lose weight may want to consider limiting the number of alcoholic drinks they consume post-surgery.
 
 
 WFIRM-led project aims to study health risks astronauts face from exposure to space radiation
 
WFIRM-led project aims to study health risks astronauts face from exposure to space radiationThe Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine has been selected by NASA to lead a multi-institutional project to better understand the health risks astronauts face from the exposure to galactic cosmic ray (GCR) and solar energetic particle (SEP) radiation that occurs from long-duration missions in deep space, and to develop countermeasures to keep astronauts safe.
 
 
 Tulane professor wins Department of Defense grant for research into arteriovenous malformations
 
Tulane professor wins Department of Defense grant for research into arteriovenous malformationsTulane University's Stryder Meadows, a cell and molecular biology professor, received a $1.7 million grant from the Department of Defense to study how arteriovenous malformations (AVM), which are defects in arteries, veins and capillaries, form Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT), a genetic disorder that affects about 1 in 5,000 people.
 
 
 Genetic diversity of tumor tissues can be barrier to precision medicine in gastric and esophageal cancers
 
Genetic diversity of tumor tissues can be barrier to precision medicine in gastric and esophageal cancersA new study focused on describing genetic variations within a primary tumor, differences between the primary and a metastatic branch of that tumor, and additional diversity found in tumor DNA in the blood stream could help physicians make better treatment choices for patients with gastric and esophageal adenocarcinoma.
 
 
 MGH researchers identify first effective treatment option for autoimmune small-fiber polyneuropathy
 
MGH researchers identify first effective treatment option for autoimmune small-fiber polyneuropathyAn analysis of the medical records of patients treated at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) for an often-mysterious condition involving damage to small nerve fibers supports the hypothesis that some cases are caused by autoimmune disease and also identifies the first effective treatment option.
 
 
 Research shows how food poisoning bacteria can multiply and spread inside micro-organisms
 
Research shows how food poisoning bacteria can multiply and spread inside micro-organismsNew research by a team from London's Kingston University has shown how the food poisoning bacteria Campylobacter can multiply and spread inside micro-organisms called amoebae- which could lead to a better understanding of how bacteria survive and help efforts to prevent the spread of infection.